Hybrid work … without the #theatre … #lmamkt

Link: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/hybrid-work-without-theatre-elevate-ac

Thank you, Robert Clarke and Elevate, for the lovely chat and this interview write-up. I enjoyed our conversation immensely ✨

“Roy Sexton on Teams, Leadership and Learning: ‘You’re only as good as the rest of the cast. Bad actors are the ones who only worry about themselves, whereas good performers think: How can I help the entire cast be good? The audience experiences the entire show, not just one performer – not just the lead. It’s the same in business…’ #elevateelite #leadership #learning Click image for more.”

#lmamkt 🎭

Of scouts and leaders, lawyers and tape measures … Legal Marketing Coffee Talk with guest Mark Beese, president of Leadership for Lawyers

VIDEO LINKS … Facebook: https://fb.watch/e736QkZrLg/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/posts/kates-media_lmct-legalmarketing-lmamkt-activity-6950571168760299520-sX8i?utm_source=linkedin_share&utm_medium=ios_app

YouTube: https://youtu.be/tKUrJq2o7L4

Rob Kates and I had a marvelous time chatting with fab Mark Beese, president of Leadership for Lawyers, about the core principles of inclusive, collaborative #leadership, particularly as related to transformational change in #lawfirms. We discuss core change style indicators by leader type (conserver, pragmatist, originator) and how to create greater team balance. Mark also shares with us lessons learned on his recent #scoutjamboree trip to Korea and how #scouting has informed his consulting practice.

Other assorted topics include #dogs, #birthdays, #collecting, #tapemeasures, #tripods, #Cats, #lawyers, #givingback, #millennials, and #compassion.

Panel discussion June 21: “Does Being Oceans Apart Mean Being Practices Apart?”

Thank you, Pinnacle, Charlotte Takács, Simon P Marshall, and team for including me not only in your helpful report but also in this essential conversation. Honored to join Gillian Ward and Matthew Fuller for this discussion. Pinnacle’s 2022 Pitch Management report highlighted significant experiences of top CMOs, who deal with cross border politics, cultural differences, language barriers and overseas understanding in not only the pitching process but internally team to team. To keep firms running smoothly, it’s a balancing act of technology, understanding and communication, which we will explore on this webinar.

Sign up now: https://pinnacle-oa.zoom.us/webinar/register/8016547668718/WN_4OqVuJL5TGeNWZOYXg8IcQ

Event description: “In the global competitive market law firms operate in, we’re bringing together a panel of global marketing and BD leaders from across the AmLaw 200 to discuss how firms around the world function with cross border teams, what practices they share, what’s different and how they cater and adapt their differences if pitching across seas. 

“We will get to the heart of the challenges and the opportunities faced internationally, drawing on the personal experiences of each leader, delving into elements such as how they drive efficiency, what technology they use to communicate across regions, and how they finetune each pitch to the client, plus much more.”

“Information that could be useful in influencing the firm’s direction and strategy” … How Clark Hill Makes Use Of Technology To Market Itself … #lmamkt

Truly thrilled with this coverage from Law360 of our Clark Hill Law marketing and business development transformation. Every member of our incredible team and their efforts are represented in this overview. So proud to work with these talented souls who all lead with data, ingenuity, strategy, grit, inclusion, collaboration, and heart. And we’ve had a lot of fun along the way!

We discuss a lot in legal marketing circles the need to approach this work with intentionality as other industries do (no more “random acts of marketing”!) and the desire to advocate for ourselves as a substantive profession. For me, I couldn’t be prouder of how my colleagues’ efforts as outlined here align with that direction.

Original post: https://www.law360.com/pulse/articles/1494809/how-clark-hill-makes-use-of-technology-to-market-itself

How Clark Hill Makes Use Of Technology To Market Itself

By Aebra Coe

Law360 (May 19, 2022, 3:59 PM EDT) — Asana, SharePoint, Wufoo, Sprout Social, Google Docs, SQL database and PowerBI are all fairly typical technologies for law firms to use in their marketing and business development efforts, but Detroit-based Clark Hill has leveraged those ordinary technologies for some interesting uses, earning it a recent international award.

Susan Ahern, Clark Hill PLC’s chief marketing and business development officer, is the quarterback behind much of the tech-heavy marketing tactics that earned the firm Best Marketing Initiative honors at the Managing Partners’​ Forum Awards for Management Excellence in 2020.

Ahern recently spoke to Law360 Pulse, offering a look behind the scenes at the firm’s marketing and business development technology, and the platform around which the technology spins. The system has been up and running for around four years now.

Using off-the-shelf technologies like Power BI and SharePoint for data analytics and team collaboration, Ahern and her team have been able to build an online platform that allows them to track and make use of data in their decision-making around business development.

The data is input through a combination of sources. Digital collection forms are used to gather data directly from attorneys, and other data flows in from the marketing and business development team. Additionally, some streams of data, like digital reach and engagement, are automated through the firm’s other platforms.

“We have been able to implement online data collection processes for different types of data throughout the firm,” Ahern said. “Our systems then organize and store the information into different datasets, [and] our dashboards pivot on these datasets.”

Examples of the types of reports the dashboards can produce include detailed information on client feedback and check-ins, client pitches, event sponsorships and their success, attendance information on events and webinars, and data on social media marketing campaigns.

The dashboards, which are accessible through an online portal, visually illustrate through charts the activities the team engages in and the results of those activities on a wide range of the firm’s marketing and business development operations, according to Ahern. They run and update in real time.

“We have the flexibility to adjust the dashboards to communicate what is most useful,” she said. “Each dashboard is dynamic and can be filtered in multiple different ways by the user. We have been able to identify trend lines year-on-year through dashboards we’ve had up and running over a number of years.”

When it comes to event sponsorships, for example, individual partners and the business development team can see who has requested sponsorships, whether they were granted, and where that money went in terms of industry, client or geography. There’s also data on how much revenue was generated by the attorney making the request.

Since the firm implemented tracking around sponsorships, the number of requests for them has actually declined, Ahern said.

“Having that information has helped hold everyone accountable for what they requested,” she said.

When it comes to pitching clients, attorneys and business development professionals can search and sort data by the rates pitched, client, industry of the client, rate of success by office or business unit, and reasons the pitch was unsuccessful. The firm gathers somewhere between 35 and 40 pieces of information on any given pitch, Ahern said.

According to Ahern, she is often approached by legal technology providers trying to sell her platforms and services related to business development and marketing, but when she asks how they would capture, collate, organize and leverage the data the firm is currently using, the response tends to be underwhelming.

“The more I see of these technologies, the more I realize that they are limited. They are different versions of the same thing,” she said.

Earlier this year, the firm hired a data coordinator Todd Krigner. 

Ahern says she remains happy with the system the firm has created in-house, which allows her to translate data, and at times non-numerical data, into something measurable that can help direct the firm’s actions and strategy.

“What we did was look at information that could be useful in influencing the firm’s direction and strategy,” she said. “Most technology in law firms is not being used to its full potential. There are so many other creative ways it can be used to really bring the firm forward.”

–Editing by Robert Rudinger.

Thank you, Simon P Marshall, Charlotte Takács, and Pinnacle for including my thoughts in this fab report “How Winners Win.” #lmamkt

Thank you, Simon P Marshall, Charlotte Takács, and Pinnacle for including my thoughts in this fab report “How Winners Win.”

You can get your copy here: https://www.pinnacle-oa.com/pitch-management-report-2022/

EXCERPT: “Human interest is key to understanding the buyer, yet as Roy Sexton of Clark Hill Law believes, the journey is a two-way process. Buyers are increasingly interested in the firm’s culture and each person’s passion for individual causes. Putting himself in the client’s shoes, Sexton expands on this sentiment, ‘I see what your pitch materials look like, but what kind of people are you and do you care about the environment and your community, diversity and equity? They want to know that you’re decent human beings, on top of the fact that you’re a good lawyer. You should provide an authentic performance and tell people that you’re doing things that show your passions.’”

Charlotte writes, “Leading U.S. law firms are looking at pitching in an increasingly wider context and use automation and analytics to free up time to understand the buyer journey and bring more personality to pitches. Months of work is paying off today as we release Pinnacle’s review of ‘How Winners Win’ in North American law firms. It’s different. It’s inspiring. It’s insightful. It’s a glimpse into what firms, who are ahead of the curve do. Reading it, will be 20 minutes well (very well) spent.

“As always, getting ahead is only possible with a community wanting to do bigger and better – with people who will lead from the front, empower others through the benefit of knowledge and see the value of sharing. … Read, share, pass on to a colleague with as much love as I do and if you can spare 15 minutes to let me know what you thought about it, please drop me an email on charlotte.takacs@pinnacle-oa.com!”

“Marketing Dynamics: Lawyers and Marketers in Unison” – Whiteboard Geeks invite me to their “Digital Marketing Master” podcast … #lmamkt

Thank you, Luis Gonzalez and Whiteboard Geeks, for having me as a guest on your “Digital Marketing Master” podcast!

“Marketing Dynamics: Lawyers and Marketers in Unison … In this episode of the Digital Marketing Master podcast, Roy Sexton speaks acutely on the interactions between lawyers and legal marketing teams on the forefront of his work at Clark Hill Law.”

Cybersecurity isn’t a tech problem, but a people one: Fortress SRM’s Peter Cavrell and Chuck Mackey on Legal Marketing Coffee Talk

Rob (“Guy Fawkes”) and I had such a great and informative chat today on cybersecurity with Fortress SRM’s Peter Cavrell and Chuck Mackey. A timely topic for sure.

Thank you also to Richard Levick who joined us for the show opening to salute legendary Michael O’Horo, who will be so deeply missed. We discussed Mike’s candor, heart, authenticity, leadership, and … Porsche-buying negotiation skills, among other things. ❤️

Facebook: https://fb.watch/bxjbv1glyU/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/posts/kates-media_legalmarketingcoffeetalk-legalmarketing-lmct-activity-6904171292271226880-0WAI

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMfkgcReb08

Shout outs during the show to Denise Zdena Pouza, Timothy Corcoran, Mark T Greene, Kimberly Bell Schultheis, Patrick Fuller, Deborah Farone, Amy Payton Verhulst, Gail Porter Lamarche, Dianne Rychlewski, Don Sexton, Susie Sexton, V For Vendetta, and Phyllis Diller.

The conversation with Peter and Chuck dives into the risks and opportunities for lawyers (and consultants) to help their clients map processes, policies, and rules to anticipate, avoid, and mitigate risk. Cybersecurity isn’t a tech problem, but a people one.

We discuss how bad actors avail themselves of human weakness, and talk about the importance of table top exercises to increase agility in one’s organization. We cover how legal marketers and business development professionals can frame their firms’ messages on this topic and help keep their firms safe in a digital landscape. And the essential role of crisis communications, public relations, and media relations.

EmpoweredWomen2022

Join us on June 2nd from 8:30 am to 5:30 pm CT at The Chicago Athletic Association.

Registration and networking breakfast, welcome by event producer Susan Freeman [she/her] 🗣, opening remarks by Joel Stern, Esq., a word about Dress for Success Worldwide by Natalie Altonia Borneo, morning keynote by Michelle Wimes (she, her, hers), Esq., luncheon keynote by Wendy Doyle, closing remarks by #EWE Committee Chair Joni Wickham & Mayor Sylvester “Sly” James, Jr., and TED-style talks throughout the day by the many remarkable women seen below and the event emcee, Roy Sexton.

The event will be followed by an on-site networking cocktail reception!

Sponsor and/or register today:
https://lnkd.in/ggZX2BvD

Thank you, E.J. 🙌🎭❤️

Kat Kelly-Heinzelman on my mom Susie Sexton: “Every now and then someone special comes into our lives, and we don’t always know they are going to be special until we have known them for a while.”

Read Kat’s full post here: https://lighthousekat.wordpress.com/2022/01/30/susie-sexton/

Kat Kelly-Heinzelman on my mom Susie Sexton: “Every now and then someone special comes into our lives, and we don’t always know they are going to be special until we have known them for a while. Susie was like that for me. I first met her late one night on Facebook when I came home from work – when I was working second shift and I was relaxing and catching up on the things that had happened while I had been working. We got to talking and I found out that I knew her son and didn’t even know it. Not well yet but that too would come. I found that Susie and I had a lot in common and that we liked a lot of the same things. She lived in the house she grew up in which I found very cool. I used to tell her I would come a paint her porch and then we would sit in a rocking chair and gossip while we drank coffee in the morning or wine in the early evening. But life got too busy for both of us to do that and now we won’t ever get to that.”

Love you, Kat – thank you for this. Your friendship was a lifeline to her, and she truly felt “seen” by you in all the best ways. I’ll always be grateful to you for that. ❤️

Rambling Thoughts

Every now and then someone special comes into our lives, we don’t always know they are going to be special until we have known them for a while. Susie was like that for me. I first met her late night on Facebook when I came home from work when I was working second shift and I was relaxing and catching up on the things that had happened while I had been working. We got to talking and I found out that I knew her son and didn’t even know it. Not well yet but that too would come. I found that Susie and I had a lot in common and that we liked a lot of the same things. She lived in the house she grew up in which I found very cool. I used to tell her I would come a paint her porch and then we would sit…

View original post 241 more words

Thank you. Thank you very much. LMA Annual Conference 2022 – Las Vegas #LMA22

Thank you. Thank you very much. 🕺 🎲


🎲🎤 Ahem 🎤🎲 We need to interrupt your usual programming to share a special message from Legal Marketing Association President-Elect Roy Sexton on why you should consider joining him at #LMA22 in Las Vegas!

More info on LMA Annual Conference 2022: Stretch beyond. Together. here: https://lma22.legalmarketing.org/

Glorious fairytales of hardship: Peacemaker; tick, tick…BOOM!; and Being the Ricardos

I spent this afternoon with John Cena. It was heaven. HBOMax’s Peacemaker is brilliant. A dash of Netflix’s Cobra Kai, a smidge of Fox’s Deadpool, some of Amazon’s The Boys, and even a little of HBO’s Watchmen. (That last reference comes full circle as Watchmen’s “The Comedian” was a riff on the original comic book “Peacemaker.”)

The show is bonkers, irreverent, subversive, and more than a bit poignant. Yes, Peacemaker is a study in male arrested development and will appeal to the naughty and vulgar 8th grader in all of us.

But Cena also conveys a tragic sadness amidst the rampant silliness, a beefy Willy Loman in spandex. And the smart ensemble trapped in an unceasing series of Rube Goldberg-esque dead-ends owes as much to The Iceman Cometh as it does to the X-Men.

See? Not all of my references are comic book-oriented.

Danielle Brooks as a comically green field agent (who might not be as inept as she telegraphs), Jennifer Holland as her more seasoned (read: wryly, candidly cynical) colleague, and Freddie Stroma as adorably homicidal and overeager wannabe sidekick Adrian Chase (aka “Vigilante”) are standouts.

Showrunner James Gunn takes the merry melody he began in last year’s The Suicide Squad and turns it into a symphony. Whereas that film occasionally was mired in its own fan service, Peacemaker builds upon its predecessor’s promise and avails itself of the expanded real estate serial television provides to develop its characters without sacrificing any gee whiz puerile shenanigans.

And watching The Suicide Squad is not a prerequisite. There is a brief recap in the first episode, and, in many ways, Peacemaker is the far stronger production. I almost wish I HADN’T seen The Suicide Squad first (which nonetheless I did enjoy).

Even if you loathe superheroes – or ESPECIALLY if you do – you’ll find it endlessly entertaining.

A week or so ago, I caught up with Netflix’s tick, tick…BOOM! and Amazon’s Being the Ricardos, which also could be dubbed the “late bloomers double feature” (not just because I saw them well after their respective premieres). Both films explore the challenging intersection of art and commerce, a limbo often riddled with casualties who *just* haven’t quite made it yet but keep hitting that show biz gaming table for one last hopeful spin.

tick, tick…BOOM! is the autobiographical musical by the late Jonathan Larson, Pulitzer Prize-winner for Rent. Detailing his 30th year of living, the piece reads like a Gen X bohemian Company with its protagonist bouncing from well-meaning friend to less-well-meaning friend on a journey to find himself and a backer for his long-gestating musical (no, not Rent … yet).

Director Lin Manuel-Miranda displays a sure hand with the material, fueled no doubt both by love and respect for his contemporary Larson but also from his own career’s stops and starts.

The film is a glorious fairytale of hardship, and its leading man Andrew Garfield (always a marvel) turns in a career best performance, deftly walking a high wire of being inspiring, endearing, maddening, and self-serving. Oh, and he sings (gorgeously), plays the piano, and (sort of) dances, all while painting one of the clearest-eyed portrayals of the white hot isolation of a creative spirit I’ve ever seen.

Supporting players Alexandra Shipp, Robin de Jesus, Vanessa Hudgens, Joshua Henry, MJ Rodriguez, Judith Light, and Bradley Whitford (as Stephen Sondheim no less!) are all stellar, sharply capturing the earnest if ephemeral nature of relationships in the theatre community. There are Broadway cameos aplenty, and I won’t spoil the fun, but I will give shout outs to Laura Benanti (always a comic delight) and Judy Kuhn who are positively larcenous in their all-too-brief respective scenes.

Comparably, Being the Ricardos is shaped by the endless, thankless years performers toil in an effort to “make it.” While the film focuses on Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz at the peak of I Love Lucy’s fame, we learn, through flashbacks and writer/director Aaron Sorkin’s signature rat-a-tat dialogue, the steep challenges through which this legendary couple powered to achieve blockbuster success relatively late in their respective careers.

The film clarifies without belaboring that Lucy and Desi’s success came with a steep price. Years of working in obscurity created hairline fractures that would eventually blossom into infidelity, but throughout they remained a united front in art and business.

Notably, while Kidman doesn’t look one whit like Ball, she does nail Lucy’s husky smoker’s voice and overall demeanor. We leave the film with incredible admiration for Lucille Ball as an entrepreneur who transformed the industry, as a comic visionary with an artiste’s obsession for detail, and as a social progressive who beautifully didn’t give a damn for mid-century social norms.

Kidman and luminous Javier Bardem (as Desi) conduct an acting master class in how to portray beloved historical figures, channeling their essences, while making them uniquely their own. Consequently, they land a timely and timeless message of living in one’s moment.

They are aided and abetted by JK Simmons and Nina Arianda as William Frawley and Vivian Vance respectively. Despite Arianda being saddled with an unfortunate body shaming subplot, both Arianda and Simmons sparkle brilliantly as showbiz workhorses who simultaneously value and resent their “second banana” success.

And, for those who geek out over sumptuous scenic and costume design, there is lush Eisenhower-era eye candy aplenty, with one postcard-perfect image after another of Hollywood’s (and television’s) golden age.

The film’s politics get slippy at times. Sorkin seems intent on force-fitting a modern liberal’s gaze onto Lucy and Desi’s history, but tricky details like Richard Nixon exonerating Lucy from her communist party past get in the way. Be that as it may, the performances transcend any pedantry to detail lives fully lived in service to art and cultural progress.